If you are a teacher then please also visit my new site: intermathematics.com for over 2000+ pdf pages of resources for teaching IB maths!

This is a mini investigation based on the current Nrich task Farey Sequences.

As Nrich explains:

Screen Shot 2018-05-25 at 8.38.52 AM

I’m going to look at Farey sequences (though I won’t worry about rearranging them in order of size).  Here are some of the first Farey sequences.  The missing fractions are all ones which simplify to a fraction already on the list (e.g. 2/4 is missing because this is the same as 1/2)

You should be able to notice that the next Farey sequence always contains the previous Farey sequence, so the problem becomes working out which of the new fractions added will not cancel down to something already on the list.

Highest Common Factors

Fractions will not cancel down (simplify) if the numerator and denominator have a highest common factor (HCF) of 1.  For example 2/4 simplifies because the highest common factor of 2 and 4 is 2.  Therefore both top and bottom can be divided by 2.  4/5 does not simplify because the HCF of 4 and 5 is 1.

We call 2 numbers which have a HCF of 1 relatively prime.

for example for the number 4: 1 and 3 are both relatively prime (HCF of 1 and 4  =1, HCF of 3 and 4 = 1).

Relatively prime numbers

2: 1

3: 1,2

4: 1,3

5: 1,2,3,4

6: 1,5

7: 1,2,3,4,5,6

8: 1,3,5,7

9: 1,2,4,5,7,8

You might notice that these give the required numerators for any given denominator – i.e when the denominator is 9, we want a numerator of 1,2,4,5,7,8.

Euler totient function

Euler’s totient function is a really useful function in number theory – which counts the number of relatively prime numbers a given number has.  For example from our list we can see that 9 has 6 relatively prime numbers.

Euler’s totient function is defined above – it’s not as complicated as it looks!  The strange symbol on the right hand side is the product formula – i.e we multiply terms together.  It’s easiest to understand with some examples.  To find Euler’s totient function we first work out the prime factors of a number.  Say we have the number 8.  The prime factors of 8 are 23. Therefore the only unique prime factor is 2.

Therefore the Euler totient function tells me to simply do 8 (1 – 1/2) = 4.  This is how many relatively prime numbers 8 has.

Let’s look at another example – this time for the number 10.  10 has the prime factorisation 5 x 2.  Therefore it has 2 unique primes, 2 and 5.  Therefore the Euler totient function tells me to do 10(1-1/2)(1-1/5) = 4.

One more example, this time with the number 30.  This has prime factorisation 2 x 3 x 5.  This has unique prime factors 2,3,5 so I will do 30(1 -1/2)(1-1/3)(1-1/5) =8.

An equation for the number of fractions in the Farey sequence

Therefore I can now work out how many fractions will appear in a given Farey sequence.  I notice that for (say) F5 I will add Euler’s totient for n = 2, n = 3, n = 4 and n = 5. I then add 2 to account for 0/1 and 1/1. Therefore I have:

For example to find F6

There are lots of things to investigate about Farey functions – could you prove why all Farey sequences have an odd number of terms? You can also look at how well the Farey sequence is approximated by the following equation:

For example when n = 10 this gives:

and when n = 1000 this gives:

These results compare reasonably well as an estimation to the real answers of 33 and 304,193 respectively.

Essential resources for IB students:

1) Revision Village

Screen Shot 2021-05-19 at 9.55.51 AM

Revision Village has been put together to help IB students with topic revision both for during the course and for the end of Year 12 school exams and Year 13 final exams.  I would strongly recommend students use this as a resource during the course (not just for final revision in Y13!) There are specific resources for HL and SL students for both Analysis and Applications.

Screen Shot 2018-03-19 at 4.42.05 PM.png

There is a comprehensive Questionbank takes you to a breakdown of each main subject area (e.g. Algebra, Calculus etc) and then provides a large bank of graded questions.  What I like about this is that you are given a difficulty rating, as well as a mark scheme and also a worked video tutorial.  Really useful!

Screen Shot 2021-05-19 at 10.05.18 AM

The Practice Exams section takes you to a large number of ready made quizzes, exams and predicted papers.   These all have worked solutions and allow you to focus on specific topics or start general revision.  This also has some excellent challenging questions for those students aiming for 6s and 7s.

Essential Resources for IB Teachers

1) Intermathematics.com

Screen Shot 2021-08-21 at 1.07.49 PM

If you are a teacher then please also visit my new site.  This has been designed specifically for teachers of mathematics at international schools.  The content now includes over 2000 pages of pdf content for the entire SL and HL Analysis syllabus and also the SL Applications syllabus.  Some of the content includes:

  1. Original pdf worksheets (with full worked solutions) designed to cover all the syllabus topics.  These make great homework sheets or in class worksheets – and are each designed to last between 40 minutes and 1 hour.
  2. Original Paper 3 investigations (with full worked solutions) to develop investigative techniques and support both the exploration and the Paper 3 examination.
  3. Over 150 pages of Coursework Guides to introduce students to the essentials behind getting an excellent mark on their exploration coursework.
  4. A large number of enrichment activities such as treasure hunts, quizzes, investigations, Desmos explorations, Python coding and more – to engage IB learners in the course.

There is also a lot more.  I think this could save teachers 200+ hours of preparation time in delivering an IB maths course – so it should be well worth exploring!

Essential Resources for both IB teachers and IB students

1) Exploration Guides and Paper 3 Resources

Screen Shot 2021-12-01 at 1.19.14 PM

I’ve put together a 168 page Super Exploration Guide to talk students and teachers through all aspects of producing an excellent coursework submission.  Students always make the same mistakes when doing their coursework – get the inside track from an IB moderator!  I have also made Paper 3 packs for HL Analysis and also Applications students to help prepare for their Paper 3 exams.  The Exploration Guides can be downloaded here and the Paper 3 Questions can be downloaded here.