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circular inversion2

Circular inversions II

There are some other interesting properties of circular inversions.  One of which is that they preserve the “angle” between intersecting circles.  Firstly, how can circles have an angle between them?  Well, we draw 2 tangents to both the circles at the point of intersection, and then measure the angle between the 2 tangents:

circular inversion17

Therefore we can see that the “angle” between these 2 circles is 59.85 degrees.  If we then carry out a circular inversion we see the following:

circular inversion16

The inversion has been done with regards to the black circle centred around the origin.  The red and blue circles are mapped from outside the the black circle onto circles inside the black circle.  Now if we do the same as before – by finding the 2 tangents at the point of intersection, we find that the angle has remained the same – it is still 59.85 degrees.

It is also possible to find circles which remain unchanged under the inversion.  This happens when a circle is orthogonal (at a 90 degree angle) to the circle with which the inversion is being carried out.

circular inversion 18

The small circle has an angle of 90 degrees with the large circle, and therefore when we invert with respect to the large circle, we map the small circle onto itself.

The question is, why is all this useful?  Well, an entire branch of mathematics (non-Euclidean geometry) is concerned with being able to map points in our traditional Euclidean worldview (the geometry of high school triangles, parallel lines and circle theorems) to different geometrical systems entirely.  Circular inversion is a good introduction to this concept.

Also, circular inversion can sometimes make studying mathematical shapes easier to understand and explain.  For example, (from Wolfram):

circular inversion21

It would be very difficult to explain mathematically how the shape above is generated – whilst there are patterns, it is not obvious how to explain them. However, if we invert this shape through a circular inversion (with the circle at centre of the image) then we get the following:

circular inversion20

This is the image inside the circle – and now we can clearly see the pattern behind the generated image.  So, inversion has a lot of potential for simplifying geometrical problems.

 

geometry

Visualising Algebra Through Geometry

This picture above is a fantastic example of how we can use geometry to visualise an algebraic expression.  It’s taken from Brilliant – which is a fantastic new forum for sharing maths puzzles.  This particular puzzle was created and uploaded by Arron Kau.  The question is, which of the following mathematical identities does this image represent?

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See if you can work it out!  I will put the answer in white text at the bottom of the post – highlight it to reveal the solution.

Another example of the power of geometry in representing mathematical problems is provided by Ian Stewart’s Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities.  The puzzle itself is pretty famous:

A farmer wants to cross a river and take with him a wolf, a goat, and a cabbage. There is a boat that can fit himself plus either the wolf, the goat, or the cabbage. If the wolf and the goat are alone on one shore, the wolf will eat the goat. If the goat and the cabbage are alone on the shore, the goat will eat the cabbage. How can the farmer bring the wolf, the goat, and the cabbage across the river?

wolf goat cabbage

The standard way of solving it is trial and error with some logic thrown in.  However, as Ian Stewart points out, we can actually utilise 3 dimensional geometry to solve the puzzle.  We start with a 3D wolf-goat-cabbage (w,g,c) space (shown in the diagram).  All 3 start at (0,0,0).  0 represents this side of the bank, and 1 represents the far side of the bank.  The target is to get therefore to (1,1,1).  In (w,g,c) space , the x direction represents the wolf’s movements, the y direction the goat and z the cabbage.  Therefore the 8 possible triplet combinations are represented by the 8 vertices on a cube.

We can now cross out the 4 paths:

(0,0,0) to (1,00) as this leaves the goat with the cabbages

(0,0,0) to (0,0,1) as this leaves the wolf with the goat

(0,1,1) to (1,1,1) as the farmer would leave the goat and cabbage alone

(1,1,0) to (1,1,1) as the farmer would leave the wolf and goat alone.

which reduces the puzzle to a geometric problem – where we travel along the remaining edges – and the 2 solutions are immediately evident.

(eg.  (0,0,0) – (0,1,0) – (1,1,0) – (1,0,0) – (1,0,1)- (1,1,1)   )

What’s really nice about this solution is that it shows how problems seemingly unrelated to mathematics can be “translated” in mathematics – and also it shows how geometrical space can be used for problem solving.

Solution to the initial puzzle, highlight to reveal: The answer is the third option – 13 + 23…. = (1+2+….)2. This is quite a surprising identity. You can see it by seeing that there are (for example) 2 squares of length 2 – this gives you a total area of 2x2x2 = 23. Adding all the squares will give you the same area as a square of sides (1+2+3….)(1+2+3….) – hence the result.

 

 

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