You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘catenary’ tag.

Soap Bubbles and Catenoids

Soap bubbles form such that they create a shape with the minimum surface area for the given constraints.  For a fixed volume the minimum surface area is a sphere, which is why soap bubbles will form spheres where possible.  We can also investigate what happens when a soap film is formed between 2 parallel circular lines like in the picture below: [Credit Wikimedia Commons, Blinking spirit]


In this case the shape formed is a catenoid – which provides the minimum surface area (for a fixed volume) for a 3D shape connecting the two circles.  The catenoid can be defined in terms of parametric equations:

Where cosh() is the hyperbolic cosine function which can be defined as:

For our parametric equation, t and u are parameters which we vary, and c is a constant that we can change to create different catenoids.  We can use Geogebra to plot different catenoids.  Below is the code which will plot parametric curves when c =2 and t varies between -20pi and 20 pi.

 

We then need to create a slider for u, and turn on the trace button – and for every given value of u (between 0 and 2 pi) it will plot a curve.  When we trace through all the values of u it will create a 3D shape – our catenoid.

Individual curve (catenary)


Catenoid when c = 0.1

Catenoid when c = 0.5

Catenoid when c = 1

Catenoid when c = 2

Wormholes

For those of you who know your science fiction, the catenoids above may look similar to a wormhole.  That’s because the catenoid is a solution to the hypothesized mathematics of wormholes.  These can be thought of as a “bridge” either through curved space-time to another part of the universe (potentially therefore allowing for faster than light travel) or a bridge connecting 2 distinct universes.

Screen Shot 2019-09-29 at 7.03.34 PM

Above is the Morris-Thorne bridge wormhole [Credit The Image of a Wormhole].

Further exploration:

This is a topic with lots of interesting areas to explore – the individual curves (catenary) look similar to, but are distinct from parabola.  These curves appear in bridge building and in many other objects with free hanging cables.  Proving that catenoids form shapes with minimum surface areas requires some quite complicated undergraduate maths (variational calculus), but it would be interesting to explore some other features of catenoids or indeed to explore why the sphere is a minimum surface area for a given volume.

If you want to explore further you can generate your own Catenoids with the Geogebra animation I’ve made here.

Essential resources for IB students:

1) Revision Village

Screen Shot 2021-05-19 at 9.55.51 AM

Revision Village has been put together to help IB students with topic revision both for during the course and for the end of Year 12 school exams and Year 13 final exams.  I would strongly recommend students use this as a resource during the course (not just for final revision in Y13!) There are specific resources for HL and SL students for both Analysis and Applications.

Screen Shot 2018-03-19 at 4.42.05 PM.png

There is a comprehensive Questionbank takes you to a breakdown of each main subject area (e.g. Algebra, Calculus etc) and then provides a large bank of graded questions.  What I like about this is that you are given a difficulty rating, as well as a mark scheme and also a worked video tutorial.  Really useful!

Screen Shot 2021-05-19 at 10.05.18 AM

The Practice Exams section takes you to a large number of ready made quizzes, exams and predicted papers.   These all have worked solutions and allow you to focus on specific topics or start general revision.  This also has some excellent challenging questions for those students aiming for 6s and 7s.

Each course also has a dedicated video tutorial section which provides 5-15 minute tutorial videos on every single syllabus part – handily sorted into topic categories.

2) Exploration Guides and Paper 3 Resources

Screen Shot 2021-05-19 at 6.32.13 PM

I’ve put together four comprehensive pdf guides to help students prepare for their exploration coursework and Paper 3 investigations. The exploration guides talk through the marking criteria, common student mistakes, excellent ideas for explorations, technology advice, modeling methods and a variety of statistical techniques with detailed explanations. I’ve also made 17 full investigation questions which are also excellent starting points for explorations.  The Exploration Guides can be downloaded here and the Paper 3 Questions can be downloaded here.

Website Stats

  • 8,256,916 views

About

All content on this site has been written by Andrew Chambers (MSc. Mathematics, IB Mathematics Examiner).

New website for International teachers

I’ve just launched a brand new maths site for international schools – over 1000 pdf pages of resources to support IB and IGCSE maths lessons.

Explore here!

1-1 coursework tuition

My colleague Dr Taylan Celtik and his team offer well renowned and professional 1-1 coursework tuition.

Find out more here

IB Maths Exploration Guide

A comprehensive 63 page pdf guide to help you get excellent marks on your maths exploration coursework.

Available to download here.

Getting a 7 in IB Maths Exploration Coursework

I have just made a Udemy online tutorial course for the exploration.  This includes nine tutorial videos of essential information designed to ensure you get the best possible grade.

Use the code NEWTON for a 40% discount.

IB HL Paper 3 Practice Questions (120 page pdf)

Eight P3 investigation questions and fully typed mark scheme (around 240 marks)

Available to download here

Modelling Guide for Explorations

A 50 page pdf guide full of advice to help with modelling explorations – focusing in on non-calculator methods in order to show good understanding.

Available to download here.

Statistics Guide

A 55 page pdf guide full of advice to help with modelling explorations – focusing in on non-calculator methods in order to show good understanding.

Available to download here.

IB Revision Notes

Full revision notes for SL Analysis (60 pages), HL Analysis (112 pages) and SL Applications (53 pages).  Beautifully written by an experienced IB Mathematics teacher.

Available to download here.

Recent Posts

Follow IB Maths Resources from Intermathematics on WordPress.com